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How Sugar Brought An End to Hawaii's Nationhood

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Popcorn now comes candied in ruby red, indigo blue and more. And don't be surprised by the popcorn buffet at the next wedding you attend. Bradley P. Johnson/via Flickr hide caption

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Popcorn Gets Its Moment On The Red Carpet

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Not long after it was unveiled in 2011, controversy erupted over the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. Critics argued that one of King's quotes had been paraphrased in a way that altered its meaning. In January, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced the mistake would be fixed. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Quote On MLK Memorial To Be Fixed, But How?

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African-American Museum Has Its Groundbreaking

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The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is expected to open in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup/Courtesy Nationa African Museum of African American History And Culture hide caption

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African-American Museum Breaks Ground In D.C.

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'Panther Baby,' From Prisoner To Professor

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Nineteenth century bilboes typically found on slave ships are displayed at the Smithsonian's new exhibit: "Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty." Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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What Enslaves Us That We Won't Give Up?

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Smithsonian Sheds Light On Founding Father's Slaves

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A tower of books about Abraham Lincoln as seen from the top down. Maxell MacKenzie/ hide caption

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Forget Lincoln Logs: A Tower Of Books To Honor Abe

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"The Crying Indian," became an iconic messenger of the Ad Council's anti-pollution campaign. Courtesy of the Ad Council hide caption

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The Ad Council Turns 70

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Marine Lt. Col. John Glenn demonstrates operations inside a Mercury capsule on Jan. 11, 1961. AP hide caption

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John Glenn, A Hero Well Before Orbiting Earth

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Charles G. Dawes served under Calvin Coolidge from 1925 to 1929. Dawes is the only vice president to have both a Nobel Peace Prize for his work in World War I and a Billboard Top 10 hit, and neither had anything to do with his tenure as vice president. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Hail To The Veep: America's Executive Underdog

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