Chicano Movement's Denver Roots Run Deep

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Margaret Mitchell, pictured above in 1941, started writing while recovering from an ankle injury in 1926. She had read her way through most of Atlanta's Carnegie Library, so her husband brought home a typewriter and said: "Write your own book to amuse yourself." The result was Gone with the Wind. Al Aumuller/Telegram & Sun/Library of Congress hide caption

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Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With The Wind' Turns 75

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Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind was published 75 years ago this month. A 1936 promotional poster for the book shows heroine Scarlett O'Hara running through the streets as Atlanta burns. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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At 75, 'Gone With The Wind' Marks Yet 'Another Day'

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Economic Prospects Pull Blacks From North To South

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Original varieties of tomatoes from South America are believed to have been small, like today's cherry tomatoes. Today's large, plump tomatoes are the result of years of selection. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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DC Boasts US' Largest Exhibit On Blacks In Civil War

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The First Of Billie Jean King's 50 Wimbledons

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Golf, track, basketball ... Babe Didrikson Zaharias could do it all. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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Remembering A 'Babe' Sports Fans Shouldn't Forget

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The Cone sisters typically forged strong patron-artist relationships, but they were particularly close with Henri Matisse. While working on Large Reclining Nude, Matisse sent 22 photographs of the work in progress to Etta Cone. The Baltimore Museum of Art hide caption

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A Tale Of Two Sisters And Their Serious Eye For Art

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How 'Whitey' Bulger Greased Palms For His Freedom

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Glen Stewart Godwin has been caught before, at least twice. Convicted of murder, he escaped California's Folsom State Prison in 1987, only to be caught later that year for drug trafficking. While serving time in a Guadalajara prison, Godwin allegedly murdered another inmate in 1991 and escaped again, just months later. FBI/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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The FBI's 'Ten Most Wanted': Two Down, Eight To Go

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In 1897, New York was a town of many newspapers in which the New York World, the New York Journal, the New York Herald, the New York Post and more competed for the public eye. Library of Congress hide caption

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How A New York 'Murder' Sparked The Tabloid Wars

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Science Diction

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