Dr. Vanessa Grubbs and Robert Phillips at their wedding in August 2005. Just a few months earlier, when his kidneys were failing, she gave him one of hers. Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs

'Interlaced Fingers' Traces Roots Of Racial Disparity In Kidney Transplants

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"If there's one thing I can promise you facts are not enough...I won't say they don't matter, but they're not enough. You need to connect with people on a basic level about things. And when you do that they respond." - Michael Specter TED/TED hide caption

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TED/TED

Michael Specter: What Happens When We Ignore Scientific Consensus?

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Carrie Poppy on the TEDxVienna stage. Philipp Schwarz/Philipp Schwarz hide caption

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Philipp Schwarz/Philipp Schwarz

Carrie Poppy: Can Science Reveal The Truth Behind Ghost Stories?

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Deborah Lipstadt on the TEDxSkoll stage. TEDxSkoll hide caption

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TEDxSkoll

Deborah Lipstadt: How Do You Stand Up To A Holocaust Denier?

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When You Talk In Your Sleep, Are You Talking To Your Secret Self?

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Jennifer Qian for NPR

Listen to the Invisibilia episode

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Dead Canary Islands date palms, killed by red palm weevils, line a road in La Mersa, Tunis, Tunisia. Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside

New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as effective as physical therapy in relieving pain. The yoga protocol includes gentle poses and avoids more difficult ones. Comstock Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Comstock Images/Getty Images

Study Finds Yoga Can Help Back Pain, But Keep It Gentle, With These Poses

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

Sonia Vallabh lost her mother to a rare brain disease in 2010, and then learned she had inherited the same genetic mutation. She and her husband, Eric Minikel, went back to school to study the family of illnesses — prion diseases — in the hope of finding a cure for Sonia. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

A Couple's Quest To Stop A Rare Disease Before It Takes One Of Them

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About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

Kamni Vallabh helps her daughter Sonia get ready for her wedding, a few months before Kamni started showing symptoms of the prion disease that would kill her. Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh

A Mother's Early Death Drives Her Daughter To Find A Treatment

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In a study that tested the vision of people from a variety of professions, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley found that dressmakers who spend many hours doing fine, manual work seemed to have a superior ability to see in 3-D. Elena Fantini/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Fantini/Getty Images

A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

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A sometimes lethal strain of H7N9 bird flu that has infected about 1,500 people in China doesn't spread easily among humans — yet. But research published Thursday suggests just a few genetic mutations might be enough to make it quite contagious. Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Pasieka/Science Source

A Few Genetic Tweaks To Chinese Bird Flu Virus Could Fuel A Human Pandemic

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2 Top Michigan Officials Face Criminal Charges Over Flint Water Crisis

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Justine Orr (right), program manager for Our Place Day Services, helps David Breuer chop tomatoes during a cooking class at the center north of Milwaukee. Nearly all the center's clients pay for services with funds from Medicaid. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

Medicaid Cuts In Wisconsin Would Undermine Training For Adults With Disabilities

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