People ... People Who Eat People

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Why Runners Like To Feel The Burn

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Examining Gene Therapy As Treatment For Blindness

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Can You Make Your Baby Smarter, Sooner?

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In this illustration, new viruses emerge from an infected human throat cell. When you get the flu, viruses turn your cells into tiny virus factories that help spread the disease. Courtesy XVIVO/Zirus hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy XVIVO/Zirus

Seeing The Softer Side Of Nature

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Natural Selection Works On Humans, Too

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Scientists Solve Mystery Of Ear-Splitting Sounds

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Wes Jackson, founder of the Land Institute, at his farm in Salina, Kan. Richard Harris hide caption

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Prairie Pioneer Seeks To Reinvent The Way We Farm

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This retinal prosthesis has been implanted in the eyes of 32 patients. The device receives wireless data from the camera which it then translates into electronic signals that are sent to the brain, restoring sight. Courtesy Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Second Sight Medical Products, Inc.

Bionic Eye Opens New World Of Sight For Blind

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The study tested classically trained violinists and pianists, and found that their brains were much better adapted to discern subtle pitch and tonal differences in sound. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Say What?! Musicians Hear Better

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Forecasting Climate Change Legislation

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Every time you crack open a soda, your taste buds may help you get the full experience of the carbonated beverage. Arthur Carlo Franco/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Study: When Soda Fizzes, Your Tongue Tastes It

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Debate Over H1N1 Vaccine? There Shouldn't Be One

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A sexton beetle buries a recently deceased shrew. Image courtesy of Fabricator of Useless Articles hide caption

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To Casket Or Not To Casket?

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