Siblings Of Sick Kids Learn A Life Lesson Early

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Eat Up: Eating a large meal at the holidays won't have a big impact on your weight, says one physiologist. That's because your brain keeps a close watch on food intake and can tolerate the occasional big meal. It's slow, steady weight gain that's more problematic. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Post-Feast Weight Gain Isn't As Bad As You Think

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Remembering The Scent Of A Meal

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Four of the seven lion cubs (Panthera leo) recently born at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. Lions boast a special form of sister and brotherly alliance: sisters stay together all their lives in prides, and brothers form coalitions to conquer other prides. Mehgan Murphy/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Mehgan Murphy/Smithsonian Institution

Brotherly (And Sisterly) Love In The Animal World

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iStockphoto.com

Tuning In To The Brain's 'Cocktail Party Effect'

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Benjamin Arthur

Listen To People Attempt The Impossible

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How The X-Box Kinect Tracks Your Moves

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Are Airport Scanners Safe?

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Lou Gehrig smacks a homer in a game between Major League stars and a Japanese all-star team. Hulton Archive/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Songbirds, like this male tricolored blackbird, develop regional accents in the same way humans do, researchers found. And, like humans, songbirds seem to respond better to accents they already know. Dave Menke/Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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Dave Menke/Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Unfamiliar Accents Turn Off Humans And Songbirds

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This sculpture of a Homo neanderthalensis adult male represents Neanderthals that lived between 225,000 and 28,000 years ago. It is a reconstruction based on Shanidar 1, made for the Smithsonian Human Origins Initiative. John Gurche, sculptor, Chip Clark, photographer/Smithsonian Human Origins Initiative hide caption

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John Gurche, sculptor, Chip Clark, photographer/Smithsonian Human Origins Initiative

Growing Slowly, Humans Outsmarted Neanderthals

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An AquAdvantage genetically engineered salmon behind a non-transgenic Atlantic salmon sibling of the same age. Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies hide caption

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Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies