Can You Tell Emotion From Faces Alone? A new study suggests that when people evaluated just facial expressions — without cues from the rest of the body — they couldn't tell if the face was showing a positive or negative emotion. Enlarge this photo to see the answers. Hillel Aviezer/The Hebrew University of Jerusalem hide caption

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Victory Or Defeat? Emotions Aren't All In The Face

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The Ugly Truth About Food Waste in America

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Ig Nobel Prizes Celebrate Somewhat Suspect Science

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Looking Back On 2012 Election Technology

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Desktop Diaries: Temple Grandin

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James Watson: The Double Helix and Beyond

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Are We Getting Dumber? Maybe, Scientist Says

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Sandy punched a hole in the barrier island that holds the affluent borough of Mantoloking, N.J., temporarily splitting the community in two. The storm also destroyed several multimillion-dollar homes and erased the island's protective system of dunes. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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In Sandy's Wake, A Reshaped Coastline

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The warmer orange colors show parts of the brain most active during improvisational rap. The blue regions are most active when rappers performed a memorized piece. NIDCD hide caption

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Susannah Cahalan is a reporter and book reviewer at the New York Post. Julie Stapen/Free Press hide caption

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A Young Reporter Chronicles Her 'Brain On Fire'

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Study: Reading 'Maxim' Can Make You A Theft Target

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The first prehistoric chef who looked out at a field of grass in Africa and said, "dinner!" may have helped our ancestors use new resources in new locations. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hurricane Sandy Claims Thousands of NYU Lab Mice

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