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Bickering In Bangladesh; Curling; Glow-In-The-Dark Tattoos

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A recent study on data from a dating app found all women except black women were most drawn to white men, and men of all races (with one notable exception) prefer Asian women. iStockphoto hide caption

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Andres Quiroz, an installer for Stellar Solar, carries a solar panel during installation at a home in Encinitas, Calif. Sam Hodgson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tech Leaders, Economists Split Over Clean Energy's Prospects

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Eating 'Wilder' Foods for a Healthier Diet

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Brain Cells 'Geotag' Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where

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Hormones clearly influence a women's health, but figuring out how is a tricky business. Andrew Ostrovsky/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School. Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C. Eric H. Cline/Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University hide caption

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Stores Are Snooping Into Your Smartphone

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A Handful of Nuts, a Lifetime of Benefits?

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When Water Flows Uphill

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