Making Resolutions That Stick

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The Renaissance Man Who Got It All Wrong

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Get The Most Bang From Your Bubbly

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'Consider the Fork' Chronicles Evolution of Eating

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Chef Jack Bishop on 'The Science of Good Cooking'

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Thousands of years ago, a mutation in the human genome allowed many adults to digest lactose and drink milk. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Brain scans using Amyvid dye to highlight beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Clockwise from top left: a cognitively normal subject; an amyloid-positive patient with Alzheimer's disease; a patient with mild cognitive impairment who progressed to dementia during a study; and a patient with mild cognitive impairment. Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology hide caption

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Despite Uneven Results, Alzheimer's Research Suggests A Path For Treatment

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Does bell pepper and black tea sound appetizing? A computer may think so. Ryan Smith/NPR hide caption

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Computers May Someday Beat Chefs At Creating Flavors We Crave

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A person's DNA can say a lot about a person, but not why someone has committed a horrific crime like mass murder. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Killer's DNA Won't Explain His Crime

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Debunking Doomsday And Exploring Maya Science

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Stem Cells Treat Lou Gehrig's Disease, In Mice

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Shaken with splash of malaria drug, please. The original James Bond martini is made with gin, vodka and Kina Lillet, a French aperitif wine flavored with a smidge of the anti-malaria drug quinine. Karen Castillo Farfan/NPR hide caption

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'Instant' Looks At Polaroid's Land

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