A recent obituary in the Chicago Tribune mourned the death of facts. But are they truly dead? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The Death Of Facts In An Age Of 'Truthiness'

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How Buffett's Cancer Is Shaping National Dialogue

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Mining Quarries Millions Of Miles From Earth

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A New Stage Play Tackles Athletes And Head Injuries

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The Idea Factory: How Bell Labs Created The Future

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Keith Ballard, right, of the Vancouver Canucks is tripped by Colin Fraser of the Los Angeles Kings for a penalty during game in Los Angeles on April 18. Researchers studying hockey penalties found that teams wearing black jerseys were far more likely to draw penalties than teams wearing other colored or white jerseys. Harry How/Getty Images hide caption

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Power (Dis)Play? Teams In Black Draw More Penalties

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Gorillas are fine with being herbivores, like this one at a Seattle zoo. But humans evolved as omnivores. Is diet destiny? Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Designing A Bridge For Earthquake Country

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Untangling The Hairy Physics Of Rapunzel

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How Movie Makers Use Science To Make Magic

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Death Penalty Research Flawed, Expert Panel Says

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What Can We Learn From Video Games?

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Bo Van Pelt celebrates his hole-in-one during the final round of the Masters on April 8. New research suggests that golfers may be able to improve their games by believing the hole they're aiming for is larger than it really is. Andrew Redington/Getty Images hide caption

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Can You Think Your Way To That Hole-In-One?

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Survey participants in a UCLA study were asked to look at pictures of a hand holding different items and guess how tall, how big and how muscular the person connected to that hand actually was. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bigger, Taller, Stronger: Guns Change What You See

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How Humans And Insects Conquered The Earth

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