A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement. Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

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False-color transmission electron micrograph of a field of whooping cough bacteria, Bordetella pertussis. A. Barry Dowsett/Science Source hide caption

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A. Barry Dowsett/Science Source

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

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'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

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Writer Jeff Kluger speaking at TEDxAsheville. Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

What Makes Siblings Bond?

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Psychotherapist Esther Perel says a good and committed relationship draws on the conflicting needs of security and surprise. Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

Are We Asking Too Much Of Our Spouses?

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Anthropologist Helen Fischer explains how our brains behave when we're in love. Andrew Heavens/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Andrew Heavens/Courtesy of TED

What Happens To Our Brain When We're In Love?

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Amy Webb explains how she found love with some help from algorithms. Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Can You Use Algorithms To Find Love?

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Robotic Exoskeleton Helps Get Vets Back On Their Feet

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No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

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Dr. Timothy Jay says children are like "little language vacuum cleaners" that pick up whatever they hear. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

'Like Little Language Vacuum Cleaners,' Kids Suck Up Swear Words

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This mouse egg (top) is being injected with genetic material from an adult cell to ultimately create an embryo — and, eventually, embryonic stem cells. The process has been difficult to do with human cells. James King-Holmes/Science Source hide caption

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James King-Holmes/Science Source

First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From A Man's Skin

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It's the Sichuan peppercorn in dishes like spicy ma po tofu that makes your mouth buzz. Researchers wanted to know if that buzz is connected to the tingling you feel when your foot falls asleep. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Sichuan Pepper's Buzz May Reveal Secrets Of The Nervous System

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