Kim Kardashian and Donald Trump exemplify our contradictory feelings about the rich and famous. As Hidden Brain explores this week, we idolize the powerful, but also relish their downfall. D Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

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D Dipasupil/WireImage
Alex Reynolds/NPR

When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them

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Sam Barsky. Courtesy Sam Barsky hide caption

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Courtesy Sam Barsky

Sweater Selfies: Man Knits His Way Around The World

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Anthropologist Robin Dunbar says our social networks are limited to about 150 connections. Courtesy of Robin Dunbar hide caption

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Courtesy of Robin Dunbar

Is There A Limit To How Many Friends We Can Have?

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Are there ways to make traffic better in our cities? Video still courtesy TED hide caption

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Video still courtesy TED

Can We Improve Our Transportation Network Using...Biology?

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The highly rated variety of medical marijuana known as "Blue Dream" was displayed among other strains at a cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles in 2014. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Marijuana's Health Effects? Top Scientists Weigh In

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New Gene-Editing Techniques Hold the Promise Of Altering The Fundamentals Of Life

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Mai Dang, who owns Fashion Nails in Berkeley, Calif., does a client's nails. The ventilator hose poised over her shoulder helps keeps noxious fumes at bay. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News

California Nail Salons Start To Invest In Worker Safety

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'What Doesn't Kill Us' ... Invites Practical Medical Benefits

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More Families Choosing Cremation For Departed Loved Ones

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A child takes a facial recognition test in which he is asked to match the face on the top to one of the faces on the bottom. Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science hide caption

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Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science

Brain Area That Recognizes Faces Gets Busier And Better In Young Adults

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The National Institutes of Health has announced new guidelines for when parents should begin introducing peanut-containing foods into the diets of infants at risk for food allergies. Andrew M. Halpern/Flickr hide caption

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Andrew M. Halpern/Flickr