The Impact of War NPR news and stories about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Interviews with soldiers, world leaders, veterans, and families on the home front. Read and listen to stories and subscribe to RSS feeds.

Shirley Parrello's son, Brian, died in Iraq almost ten years ago. Sgt. Kevin Powell was with him that day, and he says he can still picture Brian Parello in the moments after the IED exploded. Storycorps hide caption

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Storycorps

After Loss, Marine's Parents 'Gained 20-Something Other Sons'

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When Sgt. Paul Braun (right) first met Philip, the Iraqi interpreter assigned to his company, he didn't trust him. But after his tour was over, he worked for years to get Philip a visa to come to the U.S. Storycorps hide caption

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Storycorps

American Soldier, Iraqi Interpreter: From Strangers To 'Brothers'

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Paul Pillar (right), a former national intelligence officer, with teammate Aaron David Miller, argues that the U.S. should have a smaller military footprint in the Middle East. Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Does U.S. Military Intervention In The Middle East Help Or Hurt?

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Monument Honors Vets Left With Scars, Physical Or Mental

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Plaster casts taken from soldiers' mutilated faces (top row), new sculpted faces (bottom row), and final masks (on the table) sit in the studio of Anna Coleman Ladd in 1918. American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

One Sculptor's Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint

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Homeless Vet's Story Illustrates Challenge In Getting Off The Street

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Kevin and Joyce Lucey remembered their son, Jeff, in an interview with StoryCorps in Wellesley, Mass. Jeff, a U.S. Marine, took his own life months after returning from a deployment in Iraq. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Nightmares And Darkness Follow Marine Home From Iraq War

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This image, posted on a militant website, shows an Islamic State fighter waving a flag from a captured government fighter jet in Raqqa, Syria. The Islamic State captured the city in northeastern Syria last year and it has effectively served as its capital. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Islamic State Rule: Municipal Services And Public Beheadings

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VA's Inspector General Finds Faked Data At Hospitals Across U.S.

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Soldiers fill a hole left by an explosion on a road outside Beiji, Iraq, in 2005. In his debut novel, Michael Pitre follows a group of Marines doing similar work on Iraq's highways. Ryan Lenz/AP hide caption

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Ryan Lenz/AP

Marine Turned Novelist Brings Brutal, Everyday Work Of War Into Focus

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VA Deputy Secretary On Wait Times: 'We Owe The American People An Apology'

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Vance, who serves as a coach, founded the group after his own struggle with PTSD. He says it helped him get out of a dark place. He now has a degree in social work. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

First Rule Of This Fight Club: You Must Be A Veteran

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Mark Pierce enlisted in the military in 1970, served in Vietnam and retired in 2010. Years later, his two sons also joined the armed forces. Courtesy of Mark Pierce hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Pierce

From A Father And Son, What It Means To Be A Military Man

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Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect in northern Iraq walk toward the Syrian border last week. STRINGER/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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STRINGER/Reuters/Landov

Embattled Yazidis Say They Are Now Enduring Atrocity No. 74

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Volunteers at the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore sort and box food donations on a conveyor belt. The bank started working with groups like the USO in 2013 to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

More Military Families Are Relying On Food Banks And Pantries

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