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The proliferation of court fees has prompted some states, like New Jersey, to use amnesty programs to encourage the thousands of people who owe fines to surrender in exchange for fee reductions. At the Fugitive Safe Surrender program, makeshift courtrooms allow judges to individually handle each case. Nicole Beemsterboer/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Nicole Beemsterboer/NPR

Kyle Dewitt was sentenced to three days in jail after he was unable to pay fees associated with catching a fish out of season. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Marcus and Joni Lamb, founders of Daystar, also host their own show, as seen in this screenshot from their network. With $233 million in assets, Daystar is the largest religious television network in America that also calls itself a church. Daystar Television Network hide caption

itoggle caption Daystar Television Network

Tom Barrett returned to the convenience store where he stole a can of beer. He spent time in jail, not for the crime, but because he couldn't afford the fines and fees that went along with wearing an electronic monitoring device. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

The Central Identification Laboratory of the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command in Honolulu, Hawaii. The Pentagon announced that it will overhaul how the organization finds, identifies and returns the remains of thousands of service members lost in past wars. Elyse Butler for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Elyse Butler for NPR

There are more than 83,000 people classified as Missing in Action and Prisoners of War from the World War II, Vietnam and Korean conflicts. The Pentagon deems 45,000 of those "recoverable." JPAC is charged with finding and identifying them. Elyse Butler for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Elyse Butler for NPR

A composite image shows part of the NPR/Center for Responsive Politics reporting team's whiteboard at NPR headquarters that was used to map out how Wellspring connects to other social welfare groups. (Click the enlarge button to see a full-size image.) John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

The Au Sable River in Michigan is a popular place for fly fishermen and the heart of a debate unexpectedly influenced by largely invisible social welfare organizations. Christine Arrasmith/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Christine Arrasmith/NPR

Jasper Burchfield was a 36-year-old part-time constable when he shot and killed Queen in 1965. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

An evening view of the Exxon Mobil oil refinery complex in Baton Rouge, La. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

The Houston Ship Channel is home to a wide range of heavy industry, including chemical processing plants and petrochemical refineries. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Richard Harris/NPR

Capt. Art Gaeten holds a blue shark that was caught during a research trip in Nova Scotia. Scientists are studying the impact of swordfish fishing methods on the shark population. Dean Casavechia for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dean Casavechia for NPR

Will Piper and Annette Pacas visit the grave of Annette's son, Alex, at Oak Hill Cemetery in Mount Carroll, Ill. Piper says he hopes to raise money to replace the makeshift, plastic marker with a permanent gravestone. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. He was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family. John Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Poole/NPR

Ernie Lopez hugs his daughter, Nikki Lopez. He was released from prison on March 2, 2012, in Amarillo, Texas, after serving nine years. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Cuban entrepreneur Barbara Fernandez Franco oversees two employees in the small living room of her home in Havana, the Cuban capital. Her boyfriend, Michel Perez Casanova (right), works in the tourism industry but also helps with her business. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR