Haitians outside a Red Cross field hospital in Carrefour, Haiti, on Dec. 14, 2010, 11 months after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit the country's capital, Port-au-Prince. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Report: Red Cross Spent 25 Percent Of Haiti Donations On Internal Expenses

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Davontae Sanford stands with his mother, Taminko Sanford, during a news conference a day after he was released from prison. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Court Fines And Fees Almost Delay Homecoming For Wrongly Convicted Michigan Man

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Some homes have fallen into disrepair in the Midland Beach neighborhood in Staten Island, N.Y. Almost four years since the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy, many on Staten Island are still dealing with the storm's consequences. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Lawmakers To FEMA: Flood Plan Overhaul Is 'Too Little, Too Late'

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Nick and Diane Camerada stand inside their home on Staten Island, N.Y. During Superstorm Sandy, the Cameradas had water up to the second floor of their home. More than three years later, they are still living in a home that is only partially renovated while continuing to deal with bureaucratic nightmares. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Business Of Disaster: Local Recovery Programs Struggle To Help Homeowners

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The Pitfalls Of Creating A Disaster Recovery Program From Scratch

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Doug Quinn stands on the empty lot where his house used to be. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Business Of Disaster: Insurance Firms Profited $400 Million After Sandy

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Navy veteran Amanda Wirtz looks through her correspondence with the Veterans Choice program. After the VA couldn't get her an appointment with a specialist, it sent her to the Choice program. But she still was unable to get an appointment for several months. Courtesy of KPBS hide caption

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How Congress And The VA Left Many Veterans Without A 'Choice'

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Last year, the ACLU of Colorado discovered nearly 800 cases where people had gone to jail in Colorado Springs, Colo., when they couldn't pay their tickets for minor violations. Pictured above is Alamo Square Park, site of the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum. Michael Bullock/Getty images hide caption

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Colorado Springs Will Stop Jailing People Too Poor To Pay Court Fines

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Rachel Jenkins outside her home in Boley, Okla. Jenkins settled her case with ResCare, who denied her medical benefits and lost pay after she injured her shoulder at work. Nick Oxford hide caption

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Labor Secretary Thomas Perez, pictured in 2015, says, "If you get hurt on [the] job, you still should be able to put food on the table, and these laws are really undermining that basic bargain." Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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One of the last family photos of Bernard Simmons is shown by his sister, Debra Simmons, in her home in Chicago. Peter Hoffman for NPR hide caption

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Doubling Up Prisoners In 'Solitary' Creates Deadly Consequences

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Bob Ebeling, now 89, at his home in Brigham City, Utah. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Your Letters Helped Challenger Shuttle Engineer Shed 30 Years Of Guilt

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