Shirley Ree Smith, whose prison sentence was commuted by California Gov. Jerry Brown, began creating greeting cards for her grandchildren while she was incarcerated. While she was out of custody after a series of legal appeals, until today, she still faced the possibility of returning to prison. Courtney Perry for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Courtney Perry for NPR

Shirley Ree Smith sits in the living room of her daughter's upstairs duplex in Alexandria, Minn. Smith is waiting to hear if California Gov. Jerry Brown will grant her clemency. "They say things happen for a reason. I'm not sure if I'll ever figure out a reason for all of this," she says. Courtney Perry for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Courtney Perry for NPR

Ernie Lopez hugs his daughter, Nikki Lopez, for the first time since 2009. Ernie was released from prison on March 2 in Amarillo, Texas, after nine years, while he awaits a new trial. Katie Hayes Luke/Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Katie Hayes Luke/Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Colleagues of Renee Royak-Schaler at the University of Maryland School of Medicine paid for and conducted an autopsy that revealed that cancer had ravaged her body. Today, autopsies are conducted on just 5 percent of patients. Jenna Isaacson Pfueller/ProPublica hide caption

itoggle caption Jenna Isaacson Pfueller/ProPublica

Sgt. Victor Medina suffered brain damage in 2009 when a roadside bomb exploded in Iraq. Blake Gordon/Aurora Photos hide caption

itoggle caption Blake Gordon/Aurora Photos

Unlike the medical examiner's office in New Mexico, which routinely autopsies sudden or violent deaths, most U.S. hospitals perform postmortem examinations only rarely. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Dr. Alex Dromerick co-directs the Brain Research Center at the National Rehabilitation Hospital. Here he observes Stephen Jones, a policeman who was involved in a motorcycle accident. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Becky Lettenberger/NPR