Cuban entrepreneur Barbara Fernandez Franco oversees two employees in the small living room of her home in Havana, the Cuban capital. Her boyfriend, Michel Perez Casanova (right), works in the tourism industry but also helps with her business. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Cuba's Budding Entrepreneurs Travel A Rocky Road Toward Success

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/324862512/325073912" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carson Luke, 13, was injured when he was restrained at a school in Virginia when he was 10 years old. Sarah Tilotta/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Sarah Tilotta/NPR

National Data Confirm Cases Of Restraint And Seclusion In Public Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/322915388/323511724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paroled From Life Sentences, Aging Ex-Cons Find World That Didn't Wait

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/319222809/319222810" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facing Doubts About Court Fines, Lawmakers Take Questions To Heart

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/318888275/318888276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Huckleberry sits in the back seat of a friend's car on the way back from visiting inmates at Sterling Correctional Facility. After 30 years in prison, Huckleberry — who was released in 2012 — helps aging inmates prepare for life outside prison. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Listen: Part 1

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/317055077/318888361" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tom Barrett returned to the convenience store where he stole a can of beer. He spent time in jail, not for the crime, but because he couldn't afford the fines and fees that went along with wearing an electronic monitoring device. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Measures Aimed At Keeping People Out Of Jail Punish The Poor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314866421/315621364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this photo from the mid-1960s, Kirk Gable, a co-founder of the electronic monitoring belt, uses war surplus missile-tracking equipment to track young adult offenders who are wearing the first electronic monitoring devices. Courtesy of Robert Gable hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Robert Gable

Poor People Can Pay Twice After Committing A Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314875465/314875466" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Court Fees Drive Many Poor Defendants Underground

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314607003/314607004" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kyle Dewitt was sentenced to three days in jail after he was unable to pay fees associated with catching a fish out of season. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Joseph Shapiro/NPR

Supreme Court Ruling Not Enough To Prevent Debtors Prisons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/313118629/314447927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Big Fees For The Big Easy's Poorest Defendants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314293287/314293288" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Unpaid Court Fees Land The Poor In 21st Century Debtors' Prisons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314138887/314138888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The proliferation of court fees has prompted some states, like New Jersey, to use amnesty programs to encourage the thousands of people who owe fines to surrender in exchange for fee reductions. At the Fugitive Safe Surrender program, makeshift courtrooms allow judges to individually handle each case. Nicole Beemsterboer/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Nicole Beemsterboer/NPR

As Court Fees Rise, The Poor Are Paying The Price

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/312158516/313996804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript