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Political News From NPR

Immigrants run to jump on a train in Ixtepec, Mexico, during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama wants nearly $4 billion in emergency funds to deal with the tens of thousands of children from Central America who've been crossing the border. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eduardo Verdugo/AP

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A bumble bee gathers pollen in September 2007 on a sunflower at Quail Run Farm in Grants Pass, Ore., where farmer Tony Davis depends on them to pollinate crops. Bees are being wiped out by a mysterious condition known as colony collapse disorder. Jeff Barnard/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Barnard/AP

Catching up with a national trend, more Hispanics say they are not affiliated with a particular religion — a shift that could make the gap between Latinos and Republicans even wider. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Marijuana grown for medical purposes is shown inside a greenhouse at a farm in Potter Valley, Calif. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Risberg/AP

GOP leadership decided against keeping an immigration-related provision in the defense authorization bill. But it allowed one banning the Defense Department from participating in climate change research. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP

Addressable TV advertising technologies, which allow advertisers to selectively target audiences and serve different ads within them, are poised to play a bigger role in political campaigns. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Rourke/AP

Death penalty opponents set up signs April 23 at the Florida State Prison near Starke, Fla., just hours before the execution of Robert Eugene Hendrix, 47, who killed his cousin and his cousin's wife to prevent him from testifying in a burglary case against him. Phil Sandlin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Phil Sandlin/AP

Whether the error in Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's recent dissent was originally his fault or a clerk's doesn't make it less cringeworthy. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Wong/Getty Images