NJ Gov. Chris Christie Could Be Having An Obama Moment

NJ Gov. Chris Christie, Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno

NJ Gov. Chris Christie emphatically counts for his audience the ways he has said he won't run for president as an amused Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno watches, Nov. 3, 2010. Mel Evans /AP Photo hide caption

toggle caption Mel Evans /AP Photo

If you have some time to kill while you're stuck at the airport or on the interstate over the Thanksgiving holiday, you could do worse than to spend your time reading the profile of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in New York magazine.

In record time, Christie has become one of the nation's most talked about politicians after taking office in January.

Even before his recent killing of the trans-Hudson River commuter rail tunnel project, he had become the darling of conservatives and many in the Tea Party movement across the nation.

They see in him their reflection, an in-your-face politician willing to say "no" to more spending and "hell no" to higher taxes.

There's a lot of talk about Christie as a possible presidential candidate. That's one more thing Christie says "no" to. But as Jason Zengerle, the writer of the piece, suggests, the governor is certainly making all the right moves for a would-be presidential candidate.

An excerpt:

Back in New Jersey, many politicos, especially the Democrats, don’t put much stock in Christie’s denials. “He swears a million times over, but c’mon, guys like me and him have egos,” Steve Sweeney told me. “You can already hear the speech. ‘In times like these, I have to put personal considerations aside and do this for my country …’ ” More than one person I spoke to made an analogy to another politician who had considerable star power but little experience when he decided to run for president. “This is sort of his Obama moment,” says Steve DeMicco, New Jersey’s preeminent Democratic strategist. “He either grabs the opportunity or he doesn’t.”



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