Flashback Friday: On This Day In 1992, Packwood Accepts Blame But Won't Quit : It's All Politics On this day in 1992, Bob Packwood, an Oregon Republican senator who had recently been elected to his 5th term, acknowledges that he did make unwanted sexual advances towards many women, but insists he would not resign.
NPR logo Flashback Friday: On This Day In 1992, Packwood Accepts Blame But Won't Quit

Flashback Friday: On This Day In 1992, Packwood Accepts Blame But Won't Quit

Dec. 10, 1992:

Kiss Packwood Goodbye button

Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore.), six weeks after narrowly winning a fifth term, admits that he did make unwanted sexual advances to at least 10 women during his 24 years in office, as the Washington Post and NPR's Nina Totenberg had reported.  But he says he will not quit his Senate seat.

"What I did was not just stupid or boorish," he offers at a Capitol Hill news conference.  "My actions were just plain wrong, and there is no other better word for it."

Still, he adds, "I am not going to resign under any circumstances."

The Senate Ethics Committee had opened a preliminary investigation into the charges, following Nina's reporting and the Post story of late November.

But Packwood will resign, on Sept. 7, 1995, in advance of a resolution calling for the Senate to expel him, which was likely to pass.

Flashback Friday is a weekly feature on Political Junkie.

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