NPR logo Obama To Lunch With House GOP's Boehner, Cantor, McCarthy

Obama To Lunch With House GOP's Boehner, Cantor, McCarthy

Speaker John Boehner at the White House with President Obama and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in April 2010. i

Speaker John Boehner at the White House with President Obama and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in April 2010. Alex Brandon/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption Alex Brandon/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Speaker John Boehner at the White House with President Obama and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in April 2010.

Speaker John Boehner at the White House with President Obama and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in April 2010.

Alex Brandon/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Continuing his effort to demonstrate his willingness to work with the political opposition, President Obama is scheduled to have lunch at the White House Wednesday with the House's Republican leaders.

The president will meet with House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the majority whip.

Asked what will be on the agenda if not the menu, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said:

Well, look, I think that the president looks forward to discussing all issues, foreign and domestic. Obviously, without adoubt there'll be, I think, a heavy discussion on the economy and on spending.

And I think the president will have a chance to talk to — through —with them many of the things that he outlined in the State of the Union. And I'm — I have no doubt that they have their cares and concerns as well.

The meeting comes less than a week before Obama delivers his fiscal 2012 budget document to Capitol Hill. But Gibbs said the president won't get into details about his budget with the Republican lawmakers.

Obama had asked the Republicans to lunch immediately after the "shellacking" voters delivered to Democrats in November. But Republican leaders declined, indicating they had other priorities at that time.

Obama will be able to use the lunch as one more piece of evidence of his reaching out to Republicans in making his re-election case to voters, particularly independents.

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