NPR logo Obama Makes New Budget Sales Pitch; GOP Strikes Back

Obama Makes New Budget Sales Pitch; GOP Strikes Back

President Obama shakes hands with eighth grade students Monday during a visit to Baltimore's Parkville Middle School and Center of Technology, where the president spoke about his 2012 budget proposal. i

President Obama shakes hands with eighth grade students Monday during a visit to Baltimore's Parkville Middle School and Center of Technology, where the president spoke about his 2012 budget proposal. Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images
President Obama shakes hands with eighth grade students Monday during a visit to Baltimore's Parkville Middle School and Center of Technology, where the president spoke about his 2012 budget proposal.

President Obama shakes hands with eighth grade students Monday during a visit to Baltimore's Parkville Middle School and Center of Technology, where the president spoke about his 2012 budget proposal.

Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images

Monday was another engagement in what's likely to be a long twilight struggle between President Obama and Republicans over the best way to get the nation's fiscal house in order while providing the best climate for future economic growth.

The president released his proposed budget for fiscal year 2012 which starts Oct. 1, elements of which he has teased us publicly with for weeks.

Meanwhile, Republicans did what the opposition party always does, which is bash the White House occupant's budget for the allegedly wrongheaded manner in which it addresses the nation's most pressing concerns.

With a Maryland middle school serving as a photo op for the president's argument that the nation needs to make in investments in education and other priorities while it attacks the deficit, Obama said his new budget accomplished as much:

These investments are an essential part of the budget my administration is sending to Congress. Because I'm convinced that if we out-build and out-innovate and out-educate, as well as out-hustle the rest of the world, the jobs and industries of our time will take root here in the United States. Our people will prosper and our country will succeed.

But I'm also convinced that the only way we can make these investments in our future is if our government starts living within its means, if we start taking responsibility for our deficits.

That's why, when I was sworn in as President, I pledged to cut the deficit in half by the end of my first term. The budget I'm proposing today meets that pledge -– and puts us on a path to pay for what we spend by the middle of the decade. We do this in part by eliminating waste and cutting whatever spending we can do without.

Republicans, for their part, described the budget as another example of the president's allegedly big-spending ways that they say will sink the economy.

From House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio:

"The president's budget will destroy jobs by spending too much, taxing too much, and borrowing too much. By continuing the spending binge and imposing massive tax hikes on families and small businesses, it will fuel more economic uncertainty and make it harder to create new jobs.

"The president's budget isn't winning the future, it's spending the future. A group of 150 American economists signed a statement sent to the White House yesterday that says we need to cut spending to help create a better environment for job creation in our country...

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