NPR logo Rick Santorum Gives New Meaning To Money Bomb

Rick Santorum

Rick Santorum Gives New Meaning To Money Bomb

Rick Santorum, June 6, 2011. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

toggle caption Gene J. Puskar/AP

Rick Santorum, June 6, 2011.

Gene J. Puskar/AP

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum has raised so little money in the second quarter — $582,348 — he'd be hardpressed to buy a house in a many middle class Washington, D.C. neighborhoods let alone win the White House.

The campaign of the former senator from Pennsylvania put a brave face on what was clearly bad news. The headline on his press release read:"Santorum Off To Solid Fundraising Start."

His finance director, Amanda Kornegay, was quoted as saying Santorum actually did quite well, considering he didn't have his first official fundraiser until June 22.

But National Journal's headline more accurately reflected the reaction of those outside the campaign: "Rick Santorum Releases Shockingly Low 2012 Fundraising Numbers."

It was Santorum's redefinition of a political money bomb which is clearly a lot different than a Ron Paul money bomb.

Actually, it's not so shocking when you consider Santorum polling average on Real Clear Politics is 2.5 percent. And if you stripped out a June Rasmussen poll that put him at 6 percent, his average would be more like 1.6 percent.

Santorum had hoped to be the favorite of social conservatives in Iowa. But Rep. Michele Bachmann from next door Minnesota has helped to ruin his plans, drawing the support of many of those voters.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.