No-Drama Obama? In New Hampshire, The GOP Strives To Meet That Challenge

New Hampshire provided next to no drama in the race for the Republican nomination on Tuesday night — and that's just how front-runner Mitt Romney likes it.

NPR's Alan Greenblatt looks at just how much momentum the convincing victory in the Granite State generates for Romney.

And Politico asks a panel of experts the operative question: Is Mitt Romney unstoppable?

But the path to the nomination is not yet strewn with roses for the former Massachusetts governor. As NPR's Liz Halloran reports, a new line of attack on Romney — fueled by a casino owner's $5 million gift to a pro-Gingrich superPAC — has the possibility of sticking at least until the next primary, Jan. 21 in South Carolina, and perhaps all the way to November.

The New York Times' Jim Rutenberg looks at the new set of challenges South Carolina presents to Romney — especially on topics of ideology and faith. And for a look ahead, check our primary calendar.

For his part, Romney seems determined to keep his sights set on the White House's current occupant. In his victory speech Tuesday night, he talked of a "failed president" who ran on "lofty promises."

On primary-night TV, the biggest drama was who would call the race soonest. And as NPR's media critic David Folkenflik points out, that race, too, was over just as the final polls closed at 8 p.m.

And if, despite all that, you'd like to relive the evening in all its blow-by-blow glory, take a dip into our blogger Mark Memmott's "river of news." Then, watch the top five candidates' post-primary speeches as collected by PBS NewsHour.

And whatever you do, political mavens, get some sleep. (Thanks, CNN!)



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