NPR logo Social Media Likes 'I Voted' Stickers

Social Media Likes 'I Voted' Stickers

A photo collage of voters on Election Day (counterclockwise from upper left): Oscar Perez, Molly Jepsen, Caryn Voskuil and Will Eden. Courtesy of Tiffany Worthy hide caption

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Courtesy of Tiffany Worthy

A photo collage of voters on Election Day (counterclockwise from upper left): Oscar Perez, Molly Jepsen, Caryn Voskuil and Will Eden.

Courtesy of Tiffany Worthy

Proudly displayed by voters on their foreheads, their children and even their dogs, the ubiquitous "I Voted" sticker became a social media star on Tuesday.

"I've been proudly wearing my sticker all day and smiling and sharing that knowing nod with passersby on the streets. Regardless of our politics, we're in this together," wrote Clare Kelly, a Washington, D.C., voter, on her Facebook page Tuesday, adding, "Hell, yeah Democracy!"

The number of tweets using the hashtag #ivoted was trending early Tuesday evening, with Twitter Government reporting "tweets with 'I voted,' '#ivoted' and similar terms total 1.4M so far today, coming in at more than 2k per minute."

Among those using the #ivoted hashtag was Glee actor Darren Criss, tweeting, "If not for the fate of the country, for yourself, or even for me — at least do it for the sticker." Within the hour, Criss' tweet had been retweeted more than 3,000 times.

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Alameda, Calif., resident Michelle Wong shows off her "I Voted" sticker on her dog, Sarah. Courtesy of Michelle Wong hide caption

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Courtesy of Michelle Wong

Alameda, Calif., resident Michelle Wong shows off her "I Voted" sticker on her dog, Sarah.

Courtesy of Michelle Wong

Damian Vantriglia, president of the sticker manufacturer National Campaign Supply, tells NPR the company started distributing the stickers nationwide in 1986 as a get-out-the-vote effort.

On Tuesday evening, Vantriglia was still delivering stickers to precincts in Florida, where the company is based. He says the company has delivered about 50 million stickers this election cycle.

"Voting is contagious. When someone sees the sticker, it reminds everyone it's Election Day," Vantriglia says.