Two Young Ladies From Washington Do Their Own Walking Straight Test

I heard from a whole lot of you about last week's post, Why We Can't Walk Straight.

First came the music lovers.

Soul Coughing fans were disappointed because their band ("I don't need to walk around in circles") was apparently wrong.

Soul Coughing YouTube

But Computers Want Me Dead fans celebrated, cause their guys got it right. ("We Walk in Circles.")

Computers Want Me Dead YouTube

And then came this, from Kaelin Richards: "After reading the story about the inability to walk in a straight line while blindfolded, my friend and I decided to try it for ourselves."

Kaelin Richards YouTube

Soul Coughing fans will double-up in pain. Here's what happened:

Kaelin says:

This video is actually the third time we tried this...the first time we actually ran into each other on the side of the field (I wish we had recorded that!), and the second time we both curved off the field about 30 yards from where we started. In the third attempt, I ended facing back the way I came. My friend made it all the way across, but she accidentally opened her eyes when she was about 50 feet from the end. She was able to self correct and then was able to stay straight to the end of the field.

Looking at our tracks in the snow, we were generally able to stay straight for about 50-60 feet from where we started, but then usually started to curve fairly sharply. It was really surprising how steep the curve could be, considering we both thought we were walking straight! This was a cool experiment — I honestly didn't think it would work in such a small space. I thought we would have to walk much further in order to see the effect.

Thanks all!



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