In Honduras, female relatives of inmates killed during a fire at a prison argue with soldiers as they try to enter the morgue in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, on Feb. 20. The fire at Comayagua prison on Feb. 14 killed more than 300 inmates. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

toggle caption Esteban Felix/AP

Violence Exposes Crisis In Latin American Prisons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147503698/147526651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A relative of an inmate observes Mexican police behind the security fence after a riot inside Apodaca prison near Monterrey. At least 44 inmates were killed during Sunday's riot, and about 30 alleged members of the drug cartel Los Zetas were rushed out of the prison. Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP/Getty Images

Prison Break Epitomizes Mexican Drug War Woes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147176117/147180154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thousands Of Homeless An Election Issue For Chavez

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147164900/147164881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Josefina Vazquez Mota celebrates her selection as the presidential candidate of the National Action Party in Mexico City on Feb. 5. She's the first woman to run for president in Mexico on a major party ticket. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images

Female Candidate Battles Machismo In Mexico

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147128296/147131059" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mexican police show the drug and weapons seized from Jaime Herrera Herrera, an alleged drug cartel member, in Mexico City on Tuesday. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images

Mexican Cartels Push Meth Beyond U.S. Market

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146952040/146969202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hundreds Dead In Honduran Prison Fire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146944915/146942662" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fishermen work near the Scarabeo-9 oil rig off the coast of Cuba. U.S. officials are concerned about the potential impact in the case of a spill. Javier Galeano/AP hide caption

toggle caption Javier Galeano/AP

U.S. Watches Closely As Oil Drilling Begins Off Cuba

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146635957/146827577" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American's Arrest In Cuba Could Have Impact

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146780111/146780110" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zelaya's supporters rallied after the coup that ousted him in June 2009. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

toggle caption Esteban Felix/AP

'Who Rules In Honduras?' Coup's Legacy Of Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146758628/146769106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In sports-crazy Argentina, sports journalism schools have cropped up to train aspiring reporters and broadcasters. Here, Argentine national soccer team coach Sergio Batista arrives for a press conference in Cordoba, Argentina, last year. Antonio Scorza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Antonio Scorza/AFP/Getty Images

Sports Journalism Is The Goooaal At Argentine School

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/145412159/146737371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

University students take part in a wake against violence held in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in October. According to the United Nations, Honduras is the most violent country in the world. Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

In Honduras, Police Accused Of Corruption, Killings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146668852/146737302" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Hugo Chavez waves during a military parade in Caracas, Venezuela, to commemorate the 20th anniversary of a failed coup attempt he led. After battling cancer last year, Chavez has returned to his high-profile, fiery ways. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ariana Cubillos/AP

Fighting Fit, Venezuela's Chavez Roars Back

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146646287/146659551" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tensions Bubbling Again Over Falkland Islands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146593292/146593289" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Haitians suffering from cholera symptoms rest at the treatment center in Mirebalais, a dusty town north of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, last June. The cholera epidemic in Haiti began in Mirebalais, believed to be the result of overflowing bathrooms from a nearby U.N. compound. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

toggle caption Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Can Vaccines Break Cholera's Deadly Hold On Haiti?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/145667552/146541241" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A vulture picks at a dead steer. Ranchers say many cattle have died because of the drought that has ravaged much of Mexico. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Drought Ravages Farms Across Wide Swath Of Mexico

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146483996/146507937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript