Batista appears with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff during a ceremony in celebration of the start of oil production by OGX, Batista's oil and gas company, in 2012. The company filed for bankruptcy Wednesday. Ricardo Moraes/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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The Billionaire Who Personified Brazil's Boom Goes Bust

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Mexican Border Factories Worry About Losing Tax Break

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Demonstrators who are critical of the Catholic Church and favor abortion rights take part in a protest in Rio de Janeiro during Pope Francis' visit to Brazil on July 27. Abortion is illegal in Brazil with rare exceptions. Some lawmakers are attempting to make it even more restrictive. Tasso Marcelo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's Restrictions On Abortion May Get More Restrictive

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Riding The Beast: A Dangerous Migration

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A street vendor fries food for lunch customers in Mexico City on July 10. Mexico has now surpassed the United States in levels of adult obesity, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP hide caption

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Following Bloomberg's Lead, Mexico Aims To Fight Fat

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HIV-positive babies rest in an orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. Treatment right after birth may make it possible for HIV-positive newborns to fight off the virus. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Marketing To Latinos: 'We Don't Fit Into A Box'

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A nurse treats a cholera patient at the Juan Pablo Pina Hospital in San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, in August. Health officials say that the strain of cholera circulating in the country— the same one that first appeared in Haiti three years ago — has also caused outbreaks in Cuba and now Mexico. Erika Santelices/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haitian Cholera Strain Spreads To Mexico

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Sony announced U.S. and European prices for its new PlayStation 4 at a news conference this summer. The game system will cost some $1,845 in Brazil, angering fans. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's Black Bloc Activists: Criminals Or People Power?

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A woman displays Cuban pesos, or CUP (right) and the more valuable convertible pesos, or CUC (left), in Havana Tuesday. Raul Castro's government announced that it will begin unifying the two currencies. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Ambassador to France Charles Rivkin (in red tie) leaves the Foreign Ministry in Paris after being summoned Monday following reports that the National Security Agency spied on French citizens. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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