Former U.S. Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton walk with Haitian President Rene Preval (center), near the destroyed presidential palace on March 22. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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United Nations troops from Bolivia distribute water and meals to the residents of Cite Soleil, Haiti, after the Jan. 12 earthquake. Marco Dormino/Courtesy of U.N. hide caption

itoggle caption Marco Dormino/Courtesy of U.N.

Workers remove rubble from a destroyed school in Port-Au-Prince in early March. Haitians now must find a way to dispose of the estimated 25 million cubic yards of debris left in the wake of the powerful earthquake that struck the country in January. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mathias Pierre, photographed earlier this month in Port-au-Prince, Haiti Chana Joffe-Walt/NPR hide caption

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In this image provided by the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon greets Sean Penn as he visits a tent camp at the Petionville Club golf course in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on March 14. Sophia Paris/MINUSTAH via Getty Images hide caption

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A man holds a handful of coffee beans during the first day of the World Coffee Conference in Guatemala City on Feb. 26. Coffee producers say they are getting hammered by global warming, with higher temperatures forcing growers to move to prized higher ground, putting the cash crop at risk. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nine-year-old Yaripsa Gonzalez (foreground) suffered stomachaches and insomnia in the days after the quake. She lives with her three siblings and her parents in a neighborhood on the northern edge of Santiago. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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