There are hints that the Trump administration might require all federally-funded construction projects to be done not only with steel and concrete made in the U.S. but also with American-made equipment, like this Caterpillar backhoe. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

For Construction Projects, 'Buying American' Means Higher Costs

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Lester "J.R." Packingham speaks Monday on the front steps of the Supreme Court. He was convicted of statutory rape in 2002, and arrested years later under a law barring sex offenders from social media platforms. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Russell/NPR

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at his swearing in earlier this month. He said Monday he will focus on issues such as violent crime and police morale. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

New FCC Chairman Plans To Block Privacy Regulations

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Supreme Court Considers Whether N.C. Law Violates First Amendment

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Nadeem Mazen instructs students at a former community space he ran. Samara Vise /Courtesy of JetPac, Inc. hide caption

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Samara Vise /Courtesy of JetPac, Inc.

When Mexican Deportees Return To A Country They Hardly Know

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Race And The Controversial History Of 'Stand Your Ground' Laws

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Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in February in Los Angeles. The mayor of the city has asked ICE agents not to identify themselves as police during operations. Bryan Cox/AP hide caption

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Bryan Cox/AP

Suspect In Kansas Shooting Faces Possible Hate Crime Charges

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White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, seen here walking toward the Oval Office in January, had been in touch with the FBI over media reports about Trump associates and contacts with Russia, according to a senior administration official. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Purinton was arrested Thursday and accused of carrying out a shooting in Olathe, Kan. He's seen here in a photo released by the Henry County (Mo.) Sheriff's Office. Henry County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Henry County Sheriff's Office/AP

Kansas Man Arrested In Shooting That Reportedly Targeted Foreigners

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Customs and Border Protection agents stand at the San Ysidro Port of Entry on Friday, Feb. 10. One memorandum issued by the Department of Homeland Security says the government will hire new ICE officers and Border Patrol agents, but it doesn't mention hiring more immigration judges. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Overwhelmed Courts Could Limit Impact Of Adding Immigration Officers

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Eloisa Tamez received $56,000 from the federal government for a quarter-acre of her ancestral land, but she says, "I wasn't looking for the money. I don't want to lose the land. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Landowners Likely To Bring More Lawsuits As Trump Moves On Border Wall

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Gavin Grimm is the plaintiff in a case scheduled to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in March. Grimm sued the school board in Gloucester, Va., after it passed a rule barring transgender students from using school restrooms that match their gender identity. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP