Some of the many video submissions for NPR's Deck the Halls singalong. NPR hide caption

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NPR Listeners Sing "Deck The Halls"

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Listeners Share Their First-Time-Ever Christmas Plans

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A 'Morning Edition' Singalong: Follow Us In Merry Measure

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Letters: Shipping Forecast-Inspired Music And Nostalgia

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A Diamond, A Motorcycle, A Wooden Ring: Best Gifts Ever

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Letters: Not 'Just A Trucker' And John Mayer's Soulful Strumming

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Zahir Janmohamed on his terrace in Juhapura, in the Muslim ghetto of Ahmedabad. Miranda Kennedy/ NPR hide caption

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In Gujarat, Anti-Muslim Legacy Of 2002 Riots Still Looms

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Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil with her grandmother, who taught her to make the Filipino dish lumpia, in 2009. Courtesy of Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil hide caption

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After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

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Letters: Walnut Theft, Md. Secessionists, Less-Orange Cheese

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Letters: Nancy Pelosi And The Affordable Care Act

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Hungry For A Hidden Word

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We asked you to send us your scary stories, then we told them to an anthropologist. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The Truth That Creeps Beneath Our Spooky Ghost Stories

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