This prototype built by MIT researchers can be reconfigured to manufacture different types of pharmaceuticals. Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab hide caption

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Inventing A Machine That Spits Out Drugs In A Whole New Way
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Syphilis can be wiped out with one to three shots of penicillin. PhotoAlto/Eric Audras/Getty Images hide caption

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Penicillin Shortage Could Be A Problem For People With Syphilis
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Do Women Need Periods?
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Ravens Tackle Lobbies The NFL To Approve Medical Marijuana
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The FDA is is expected to decide by May 27 whether a long-acting, implantable version of this anti-addiction drug, buprinorphine, will be available in the United States. The implant is more convenient, proponents say, and less likely to be abused. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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FDA Considering Pricey Implant As Treatment For Opioid Addiction
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In Search For Cures, Scientists Create Embryos That Are Both Animal And Human
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Gerald Franklin, who was diagnosed with autism as a child, is now lead developer for a website that matches workers with prospective employers. Job-related videos, he says, can help people with special needs showcase their talent. Courtesy of Gerald Franklin hide caption

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Autism Can Be An Asset In The Workplace, Employers And Workers Find
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Ron Nielsen, a retired airline pilot, tells his class of fearful fliers in Southern California that crying can be a useful emotional release. If that's what they need to do, he tells them, "let 'er rip!" Courtesy of Air Hollywood hide caption

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Hollywood Jet Gives Fearful Fliers The Courage To Soar
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"I'm afraid there's a growing sense that the path to health is through testing," says Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a Dartmouth Institute internist who has written books on the pitfalls of overdiagnosis. Encouraging the worried well to order their own blood tests feeds that mindset, he says. TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Early treatment for autism is key to making the most of the intervention, researchers say. Marc Romanelli/Blend Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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49 States Combat Opioid Epidemic With Prescription Database
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Women only got top billing in 37 percent of medical studies published in leading journals over the past two decades. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Medical Journals Give Women Researchers Short Shrift
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Putting experimental drugs to the test can be a way of life. Glow Wellness/Glow RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Professional 'Guinea Pigs' Can Make A Living Testing Drugs
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Doctors don't always suggest that pregnant women get flu shots, which may account for the relatively low vaccination rates. Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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