Which would you choose — a daily tablet or a trip to the doctor for an allergy shot? Eddie Lawrence/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Eddie Lawrence/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images

One Silicon Valley startup that encouraged its employees to think about work 24/7 found they missed market signals, tanked deals and became too irritable to build crucial working relationships. Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images
Many Grouchy, Error-Prone Workers Just Need More Sleep
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475287202/475696100" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Maria Fabrizio for NPR
Pastoral Medicine Credentials Raise Questions In Texas
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475165193/475551952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Earlier this week, NIH temporarily halted work in the cell therapy lab of Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, pending a review of safety standards there. Courtesy of National Cancer Institute hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of National Cancer Institute
Task Force Calls For More Safety Oversight At NIH Research Hospital
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475045732/475161653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images
Electric Currents And An 'Emotional Awakening' For One Man With Autism
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475112703/475165887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Employees at all Lowe's home improvement stores, including this one in South San Francisco, Calif., are eligible to have certain surgeries paid for by the company at selected hospitals. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Some Firms Save Money By Offering Employees Free Surgery
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474413496/475015357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Clinical Center on the campus of the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Md., is an internationally renowned hospital where patients are also research subjects. NIH/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption NIH/Flickr

When Erika Stallings was 22, she found out that she might have a genetic mutation that greatly increased her risk of cancer. Misha Friedman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Misha Friedman for NPR
More People Seek Genetic Testing, But There Aren't Enough Counselors
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473066953/474639433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Napster's Sean Parker Invests $250 Million In Immunotherapy Research
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474522389/474522390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Top left to right) Cladosporium werneckii, Aspergillus fumigates and Aspergillus fumigateurs. (Bottom left to right) Sepedonium, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

toggle caption Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

toggle caption Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage

After eggs of the whipworm are swallowed, they hatch in the small intestine. Though troublesome for most, they might help some people feel better. Lester V. Bergman/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Lester V. Bergman/Corbis

Ian Burkhart prepares for a training session in Columbus, Ohio. To move muscles in Burkhart's hand, the system relies on electrodes implanted in his brain, a computer interface attached to his skull, and electrical stimulators wrapped around his forearm. Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images
Technology Helps A Paralyzed Man Transform Thought Into Movement
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473821367/474120958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Inyan Pedersen, 34, with her son Knowledge. Doctors scheduled Pedersen to deliver her two younger children by C-sections because the closest birthing center is two hours away. Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR hide caption

toggle caption Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR

Zhenan Bao, a chemical engineer at Stanford University, is working to invent an artificial skin from plastic that can sense, heal and power itself. The thin plastic sheets are made with built-in pressure sensors. Bao Research Group hide caption

toggle caption Bao Research Group
Just Like Human Skin, This Plastic Sheet Can Sense And Heal
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473801506/473850594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A lucky few stay healthy despite carrying genetic defects linked to serious diseases. What protects them? Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images
How Do 'Genetic Superheroes' Overcome Their Bad DNA?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473124608/473850618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript