Dramatic Increase In Number Of People Being Hospitalized Due To Opioids

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New research finds that a yoga class designed specifically for back pain can be as effective as physical therapy in relieving pain. The yoga protocol includes gentle poses and avoids more difficult ones. Comstock Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Finds Yoga Can Help Back Pain, But Keep It Gentle, With These Poses

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Sonia Vallabh lost her mother to a rare brain disease in 2010, and then learned she had inherited the same genetic mutation. She and her husband, Eric Minikel, went back to school to study the family of illnesses — prion diseases — in the hope of finding a cure for Sonia. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

A Couple's Quest To Stop A Rare Disease Before It Takes One Of Them

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About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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Angie Wang for NPR

The Roots Of Consciousness: We're Of 2 Minds

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A sometimes lethal strain of H7N9 bird flu that has infected about 1,500 people in China doesn't spread easily among humans — yet. But research published Thursday suggests just a few genetic mutations might be enough to make it quite contagious. Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Pasieka/Science Source

A Few Genetic Tweaks To Chinese Bird Flu Virus Could Fuel A Human Pandemic

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When the neurons that release the neurotransmitter dopamine die, people develop Parkinson's disease. Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source hide caption

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Roger J. Bick &/Brian J. Poindexter / UT-Houston/Science Source

Brain Cell Transplants Are Being Tested Once Again For Parkinson's

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Drones carrying automated external defibrillators got to the sites of previous cardiac arrest cases faster than ambulances had, according to test runs conducted by Swedish researchers. Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse hide caption

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Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse
Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: That Time We Tried Pore Vacuuming In South Korea

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Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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GOP's Proposed Cuts To Medicaid Threaten Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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Jill Wiseman answers questions for the Contact Center based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service hide caption

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Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service

Opana ER, a potent extended-release opioid, was approved by the FDA for pain management in 2006. But the agency says Endo's attempts to reformulate the pills to make them harder to crush, dissolve and inject have not been successful. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Michelle Flandez's son Inti Perez — pictured at home in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, in 2016 — was born with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

A new study suggests that some small tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Small Tumors In Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All

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Legal issues — evictions, domestic violence, or insurance claim denials, for example — all too often can cascade into problems with bad medical outcomes. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Nursing homes and hospitals need to work harder to keep water systems from being contaminated with bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease, the CDC says. Getty Images hide caption

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A change in guidelines for breast cancer surgery has resulted in fewer women having to undergo repeat surgeries. Martin J Cook/Getty Images hide caption

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Fewer Women Need To Undergo Repeat Surgery After Lumpectomy

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Juanita Milton, who suffers from COPD, uses her nebulizer with albuterol sulfate at her home in Live Oak, Texas. Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News

Many COPD Patients Struggle To Pay For Each Breath

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