He's not checking your blood glucose levels. He's playing Words with Friends. Anna Zielinska/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Zielinska/iStockphoto.com

Scans from patients with fungal meningitis show evidence of a stroke (left) and arachnoiditis. New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
New England Journal of Medicine

A brain that can let other thoughts bubble up despite being in pain might help its owner benefit from meditation or other cognitive therapies. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Stacy Riggs of Fairfax, Va., is prepped for a screening for atrial fibrillation by Life Line Screening medical assistant Kennea Blake at Messiah United Methodist Church in Springfield, Va. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News

Some Health Screenings May Harm More Than Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/239861764/241319364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This riboflavin-rich material can be used to print intricate, microscopic structures in three dimensions. Courtesy of North Carolina State University hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of North Carolina State University

Craig Venter: Life at the Speed of Light

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/240751591/240751580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hydrocodone, sold as Vicodin and other brand names, may face tighter restrictions on prescribing and use. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP

Histoplasma capsulatum is common in soil in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic. So how did it get a rancher in Montana sick? CDC hide caption

toggle caption
CDC

The goals of therapy remain the same, but the business side is undergoing big changes. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Therapists Explore Dropping Solo Practices To Join Groups

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/234737302/240428461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

HIV-positive babies rest in an orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. Treatment right after birth may make it possible for HIV-positive newborns to fight off the virus. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Tyler Engel with his parents, Dave and Jennifer. His doctor and therapist worked with the family to help Tyler recover from a concussion. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

toggle caption
Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Doctors Enlist Therapists To Deliver Better, Cheaper Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/226108057/239699786" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maybe someday Jerry won't be laughing at George's follicularly challenged scalp. But despite scientific advances there's still no cure for baldness. NBC/NBC via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NBC/NBC via Getty Images

Women's moods can change based on the phases of their menstrual cycle. But does that mean they have a psychiatric disorder? Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Should Severe Premenstrual Symptoms Be A Mental Disorder?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/223805027/238899491" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript