A Struggle To Define 'Death' For Organ Donors
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Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Treat, Even Reverse, Diabetes
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A bus in Washington, D.C., displays an advertisement for a female condom in July 2010. To encourage their use, community groups distributed more than 500,000 of the female condoms, flexible pouches that are wider than a male condom but similar in length, during instruction sessions at beauty salons, barber shops, churches and restaurants. Drew Angerer/AP hide caption

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Cheney Operation Underscores Heart Transplant Issues
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The Duchesne Clinic in Kansas City, Kan., is just one free clinic that might have to adjust the way it operates under the new health care law. Elana Gordon/KCUR hide caption

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Health Care Law Puts Free Clinics At A Crossroads
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Picture An Embryo
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Aspirin helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but the jury's still out on cancer. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Weighing The Pros And Cons Of Aspirin Regimens
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No anesthesia here: A patient watches his colonoscopy as it happens at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital in New York. Ted Thai/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image hide caption

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Young-min Kwon of Massachusetts General Hospital holds the metal-alloy ball of Susy Mansfield's faulty artificial hip joint. The yellowish tissue on top is dead muscle caused by a reaction to the metal debris produced by the defective hip implant. Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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Prone To Failure, Some All-Metal Hip Implants Need To Be Removed Early
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Cells gathered during a Pap test. Those on the left are normal, and those on the right are infected with human papillomavirus. Ed Uthman/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Doctors Revamp Guidelines For Pap Smears
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