Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts. iStockphoto hide caption

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Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder

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The vast majority of young physicians surveyed by Stanford researchers wouldn't want to receive CPR or cardiac life support if they were terminally ill and their heart or breathing stopped. UygarGeographic/iStockphoto hide caption

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Dr. Lisa Sterman held a Truvada pill at her office in San Francisco in 2012. She prescribed Truvada to patients at high risk for HIV infection even before the Food and Drug Administration approved the medicine explicitly for that purpose. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Red blood cells infected with the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Plasmodium is the parasite that triggers malaria in people. Gary D. Gaugler/Science Source hide caption

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Experimental Malaria Vaccine Blocks The Bad Guy's Exit

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Two cervical cancer cells divide in this image from a scanning electron microscope. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Should HPV Testing Replace The Pap Smear?

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Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don't Try This At Home

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To Pay For Hepatitis C Drugs, Medicare Might Face A Steep Bill

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Walter Bianco's liver is severely damaged by hepatitis C, but insurers had refused to pay for the medications that could cure him. Alexandra Olgin for NPR hide caption

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The mask of this Kiev protester (at a 2012 demonstration demanding more funding for HIV treatment) reads "quarantine." There are enough drugs to treat only half the HIV patients in Ukraine. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Corruption In Ukraine Robs HIV Patients Of Crucial Medicine

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Walter Bianco's liver is severely damaged by hepatitis C, but insurers had refused to pay for the medications that could cure him. Alexandra Olgin for NPR hide caption

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Medicare Backs Down On Denying Treatment For Hepatitis Patient

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