From left, Priscilla Howard, Crystal Hanna and Nancy Haunty, all breast cancer patients, listen at a Food and Drug Administration hearing on Avastin in Silver Spring, Md., on Tuesday. Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Dr. Ray Dorsey video chats with his patient, Victor Jarzombeck, from his office at Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore. Dorsey has been treating Jarzombeck, who lives nearly 350 miles away in New Hartford, N.Y., for three years. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR

The Parkinson's Doctor Will Video Chat With You Now

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137089619/137441992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Swaying Of Hammock Lulls Brain Into Deeper Sleep

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137397961/137397945" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Rep. Michele Bachmann, pictured here at the New Hampshire Republican presidential debate on June 13, have signed a pledge to push through anti-abortion measures if elected president. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jim Cole/AP

GOP Hopefuls Divided Over Anti-Abortion Pledge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137350265/137360736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York plastic surgeon Brad Jacobs holds a silicone gel breast implant in 2006. That year the FDA allowed silicone implants back on the market, after a 14- year hiatus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New Drugs Offer Hope For Hepatitis C Sufferers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137347068/137347060" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doctors who talk to a patient before surgery are less likely to operate on the wrong limb than those who first see the patient when he or she arrives in the operating room. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

Can "Stem Cell" Treatments Help Athletes?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137250823/137250815" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript