Patients who get the comforts of palliative care as well as disease treatment live longer, studies show, than those who only get treatment for the disease. Annette Birkenfeld/iStockphoto hide caption

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Traditional warning labels on medicine boxes tend to be long on confusing language, critics say, but short on helpful numbers. iStockphoto hide caption

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How Well Does A Drug Work? Look Beyond The Fine Print
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When weighing the risk of heart disease, how the numbers are presented to patients can make all the difference. iStockphoto hide caption

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For Better Treatment, Doctors And Patients Share The Decisions
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Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Effective New HIV Treatment Makes Researcher 'Hopeful' In Fighting Epidemic
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Brian Zikmund-Fisher with his wife, Naomi, and daughter, Eve, in 1999, after he had a bone marrow transplant. He says he made the decision to have the treatment based on factors he couldn't quantify. Courtesy of Brian Zikmund-Fisher hide caption

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What The Odds Fail To Capture When A Health Crisis Hits
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Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems
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"We can't continue to have unsafe medical care be a regular part of the way we do business in health care," said Harvard School of Public Health's Dr. Ashish Jha at a Senate hearing Thursday. AP hide caption

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Miss Idaho Sierra Sandison, shown here in her home town of Twin Falls, Idaho, decided not to hide the insulin pump she wears to treat Type 1 diabetes during the pageant. Photo illustration by Drew Nash/Courtesy of Times News hide caption

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