U.S. authorities are working on an emergency deal to import the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril, which is not currently licensed in the U.S. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

At Gerald Chinchar's home in San Diego, Calif., Nurse Sheri Juan (right) checks his arm for edema that might be a sign that his congestive heart failure is getting worse. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

The elaborate Alnwick Garden in northeast England includes a "Poison Garden" that showcases plants with killer properties. Visitors are invited to look but not touch or even smell. Joanne Silberner for NPR hide caption

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Joanne Silberner for NPR

Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths around the world. Thomas Fredberg/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Thomas Fredberg/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Overlooked Drug Could Save Thousands Of Moms After Childbirth

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Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy

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Doctors have known for a long time that alcohol consumption can cause heart problems. Researchers in Germany used the Oktoberfest beer festival to link binge drinking to abnormal heart rhythms. Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

The inmates in Bellevue are awaiting trial for a variety of offenses, ranging from sleeping on the subway to murder. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Psychiatrist Recalls 'Heartbreak And Hope' On Bellevue's Prison Ward

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An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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Angie Wang for NPR

Listen to Anne Webster read her poem

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Anders Osborne at his home studio. The New Orleans bluesman is launching a program to help musicians and others in the industry stay sober in a work environment where that can be difficult. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

'Send Me A Friend': Anders Osborne Helps Musicians Stay Sober On Tour

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Jose Cedillo, a 41-year-old former restaurant worker from Honduras, struggles to get health care for his diabetes. He often finds himself without a job and homeless on the streets of Baltimore. Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News

Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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Dr. James Baker holds a photo of his son, Max, who had been sober for more than a year and was in college when he relapsed after surgery and died of a heroin overdose. Craig LeMoult/WGBH hide caption

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Craig LeMoult/WGBH

How Do Former Opioid Addicts Safely Get Pain Relief After Surgery?

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Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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