How does your child's spoonful of medicine measure up? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why It's So Easy To Give Kids The Wrong Dose Of Medicine

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A CT scan of the brain shows the cerebellum, a small portion of each temporal lobe, and the sinuses. Andrew Ciscel via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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There's a lot going on with the little blue pill called Truvada made by Gilead Sciences of Forest City, Calif. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Pill Cuts HIV Infection Risk Significantly, For A Price

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Stephen Smith at Stanford University developed a process called array tomography to show mouse brain synapses in different colors. Courtesy of Dr. Stephen Smith hide caption

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'Emperor Of All Maladies' Traces Cancer Treatments

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A woman prepares to undergo radiation therapy for an invasive cancer. Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee writes about the discovery of radiation therapy as a treatment option in his biography of cancer. National Cancer Institute hide caption

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An Oncologist Writes 'A Biography Of Cancer'

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A man helps his dengue fever-stricken daughter in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In June, Honduran authorities declared a state of emergency due to the high rate of dengue cases reported around the country. Orlando Sierra/AFP hide caption

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