Op-Ed: More Not Always Better When Treating Cancer
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140060698/140060689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pharmacist Kristy Hennessee administers a vaccination against whooping cough at a Walgreen's pharmacy in Pasadena, Calif. last year. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Drug firms fear that being "liked" on Facebook could get them in trouble with the FDA. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com
Why Drug Companies Are Shy About Sharing On Facebook
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139859210/139859293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Howard Snitzer's heart stopped beating for 96 minutes last January. First responders didn't give up on him, thanks in part to capnography, a technology that let them know Snitzer still had a chance of coming back. May Clinic hide caption

toggle caption May Clinic
When Not To Quit: Man Revived After 96 Minutes
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139670971/139843532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The scientists who sequenced the marijuana plant say they hope the next generation of pot will have stronger therapeutic compounds. JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images

A CT scan of a human lung. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com