The program BAM (Becoming a Man) works with teenagers and uses cognitive behavior therapy to reduce violence in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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An early draft of Card III in Hermann Rorschach's psychological test. Archiv und Sammlung Hermann Rorschach, University Library of Bern hide caption

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Archiv und Sammlung Hermann Rorschach, University Library of Bern

How Hermann Rorschach's 'Inkblots' Took On A Life Of Their Own

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A doctor at a Boston Medical Center clinic counsels a patient who has become addicted to opioid painkillers, and wants help kicking the habit. Addiction specialists say drugs like suboxone, which mitigates withdrawal symptoms, can greatly improve his odds of success. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Uncertainty about the future can raise stress levels, psychologists say. Here, students in Charlotte, N.C., hold hands during a Sept. 21 protest after Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by a police officer. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Depression Strikes Today's Teen Girls Especially Hard

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(Left) Bob Hardin's son has fought alcoholism for decades. (Right) Cary Dixon's adult son has been in and out of treatment for opioid addiction. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

West Virginia Families Worry About Access To Addiction Treatment Under Trump

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Jay Zimmerman (left) and his father, Buddy, in July 2016. Buddy, who was also a veteran, passed away last September. Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman hide caption

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Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman

Veteran Teaches Therapists How To Talk About Gun Safety When Suicide's A Risk

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After about a week in detox, the men spend 60 to 90 days in this room during their treatment at Recovery Point. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

In West Virginia, Men In Recovery Look To Trump For A 'Helping Hand'

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Keith Negley for NPR

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

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The American Widow Project provides retreats for groups of military widows. Gloria Hillard /Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard /Gloria Hillard for NPR

Military Widows Find Hope And Understanding Together

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Escaping artificial light even for a winter weekend can reset sleep patterns for the better, researchers say. One good place to do it: Heliotrope Ridge near Mount Baker in Washington state. Christopher Kimmel/Aurora Open/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Kimmel/Aurora Open/Getty Images

Researchers are trying to tease apart the reasons why girls are less likely to become scientists and engineers. Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images

Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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Giving dads a task — in this case, reading — seemed to suit them better than the kind of parenting classes favored by moms. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Treating 'Imaginary Illness' In 'Is It All In Your Head?'

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A large collage decorates a wall of one exam room at the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in San Francisco, Calif. Dr. David Smith, founder of the clinic, says patients and staff call the mural the Psychedelic Wall of Fame. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Kitty Dukakis: Electroshock Therapy Has Given Me A New Lease On Life

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