Vitamin E has been associated with increased risk of death in some studies, but it may also delay cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. iStockphoto hide caption

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People drew maps of body locations where they feel basic emotions (top row) and more complex ones (bottom row). Hot colors show regions that people say are stimulated during the emotion. Cool colors indicate deactivated areas. Image courtesy of Lauri Nummenmaa, Enrico Glerean, Riitta Hari, and Jari Hietanen. hide caption

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Researchers have only recently been able to use brain scans to detect Alzheimer's risk factors in living people. iStockphoto hide caption

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Having a perfect memory can put a strain on relationships, because every slight is remembered. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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When Memories Never Fade, The Past Can Poison The Present
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There's data to support the notion that pot, or a drug based on its active ingredient, could help ease the fears of PTSD. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Could Pot Help Veterans With PTSD? Brain Scientists Say Maybe
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Brain Injuries Cause For Concern In Baseball Too
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Does Winter Really Bring On The Blues? Maybe Not
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Screenshot Courtesy of WSJDigitalNetwork
If You Drank Like James Bond, You'd Be Shaken, Too
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Avielle's artwork hangs on the walls and windows of Jeremy Richman and Jennifer Hensel's home. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Newtown Parents Seek A Clearer Window Into Violent Behavior
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Dartmouth defenders sandwich a New Hampshire wide receiver during a game in Durham, N.H., in 2009. Josh Gibney/AP hide caption

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Michael Hartnett was a Marine during the Gulf War and served in Somalia. He received a bad conduct discharge for abusing drugs and alcohol. His wife, Molly, helped him turn his life around. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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Path To Reclaiming Identity Steep For Vets With 'Bad Paper'
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Surgeons use a grid of electrodes laid on a patient's brain. They record electrical activity and can deliver a tiny jolt. Courtesy of Dr. Josef Parvizi hide caption

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Epilepsy Patients Help Decode The Brain's Hidden Signals
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