In the Institute for the Unsalvageable in Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania, shown here in 1992, children were left in cribs for days on end. Tom Szalay hide caption

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Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain

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Tyler BigChild, a board member of Vancouver's Drug Users Resource Center, is also part of its Brew Co-Op. The group teaches alcoholics how to make beer and wine, in the hopes that they'll stop risky behavior such as drinking rubbing alcohol. Portland Hotel Society hide caption

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About 10 percent of Americans have chronic insomnia. iStockphoto hide caption

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Teenagers' sleep patterns may be a clue to their risk of depression. iStockphoto hide caption

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The brain edits memories of the past, updating them with new information. Scientists say this may help us function better in the present. But don't throw those photos away. iStockphoto hide caption

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Smoking can mess up your looks, according to an ad campaign aimed at keeping teens from smoking. Courtesy of U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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Wanna Smoke? It Could Cost You A Tooth, FDA Warns Teens

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Shoppers check out vodka in a street kiosk in Moscow in 2008. Alexander Nemenov/Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Researchers Watch As Our Brains Turn Sounds Into Words

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The Institute of Medicine is reviewing how chronic fatigue syndrome is diagnosed and whether that label puts too much emphasis on fatigue over other significant symptoms. Daniel Horowitz for NPR hide caption

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Eighty percent of college students drink, and schools have had little success reducing those numbers, or the problems caused by excessive alcohol. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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No Surprises: Egyptian Military Endorses Its Chief For President

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Alexia is a condition often associated with the occipital lobe — the part of the brain that receives visual information. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Reading Teacher Who Lost The Ability To Read

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