How We Pay Attention

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129934804/129934793" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Where Your Brain Figures Out What It Doesn't Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129910351/129911901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Making The World Work For Adults With Autism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129885995/129885985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Top Army Brass Still Don't Think Brain Injuries Count

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129756105/129756094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sgt. Derrick Junge was diagnosed with a concussion, but passed over for a Purple Heart. Junge has not received rehabilitation or treatment for ongoing medical difficulties, and he struggles with simple tasks. NPR/Frontline hide caption

toggle caption NPR/Frontline

Purple Hearts Elusive For Traumatic Brain Injuries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129606127/129742884" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The hallucinogenic compound found in psilocybin mushrooms like these is getting a fresh look as a medicine to help patients cope with terminal illness. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption Wikimedia Commons

Colby Buzzell was diagnosed with PTSD after returning home. Courtesy Colby Buzzell hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Colby Buzzell

Thousands Of Returning Soldiers Face A New Enemy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129651881/129653891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Keeping an active mind by doing things like playing chess helps stave off the development of dementia. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Mental Stimulation Postpones, Then Speeds Dementia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129628082/129647744" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Studying Computers To Learn About Ourselves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129629756/129629735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Can Cognitive Exercise Speed Up Dementia?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129629744/129629732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Insomnia Means More Than A Bad Night's Sleep

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129629740/129629731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript