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What Was The Result Of U.S. Attack Against Khorasan Group In Syria?

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How Much Does It Cost To Run A Caliphate?

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Kurdish Fighters Enter Kobani To Help Battle ISIS Extremists

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The Dome of the Rock Mosque in the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound, known by the Jews as the Temple Mount, is seen in Jerusalem's Old City. Israel closed the site to all visitors on Thursday following an assassination attempt on a right-wing Jewish activist. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP

Iraqi soldiers walk in Jurf al-Sakhr, south of the capital Baghdad, on Monday after Iraqi military forces retook the area from Islamic State militants. Iraqi forces, supported by U.S. airstrikes, have made limited gains in recent months, but critics are questioning whether the U.S. strategy is likely to succeed. Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images

With Limited Gains, U.S. Bombing Campaign Faces Growing Criticism

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An explosion following an airstrike is seen in the Syrian town of Kobani from near the Mursitpinar border crossing in the southeastern town of Suruc, in Turkey's Sanliurfa province, on Wednesday. Yannis Behrakis/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Yannis Behrakis/Reuters/Landov

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud as the Saudi ambassador to the United States, Adel al-Jubeir, listens before a meeting at the Royal Palace in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, on Sept. 11. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Why Does Saudi Arabia Seem So Comfortable With Falling Oil Prices?

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Untangling The Roots Of Recent Flare-Ups In Lebanon

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Three female members of Turkey's Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) and an Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga fighter stand near the front line in Makhmur, in northern Iraq, on Aug. 9. The Turkish and Iraqi Kurds have been fighting together against the Islamic State. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Facing The Islamic State Threat, Kurdish Fighters Unite

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A voter raises her ink-stained finger after voting in Tunis Sunday. Tunisians voted in parliamentary elections that bring full democracy finally within their reach, in the cradle of the Arab Spring. Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters /Landov

Reyhaneh Jabbari, seen here during a 2008 court date in Tehran, was executed in Iran Saturday. She had said she acted to defend herself from a potential rapist. GOLARA SAJADIAN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GOLARA SAJADIAN/AFP/Getty Images

Companies from Jordan, Pakistan, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Iran were among the more than 100 Internet startups at this year's Startup Istanbul event on Sept. 30. It was Iranian entrepreneurs' first time competing on an international stage. Courtesy of Startup Istanbul hide caption

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Courtesy of Startup Istanbul

Iranian Entrepreneurs Make Pitches That Are Just Practice, For Now

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