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People gather around a helicopter reportedly belonging to Syrian government forces that crashed in March in Jabal al-Zawiya in northwest Syria. Islamist rebels captured four crew members, while a fifth was killed, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Opposition fighters have made a number of advances in recent weeks. Ghaith Omran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ghaith Omran/AFP/Getty Images

Is Bashar Assad Just Losing Some Ground ... Or His Grip On Power?

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Israel Criticized For Leaving Pregnant Surrogates In Nepal

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Earlier this month, Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's new deputy crown prince, met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo. Egyptian Presidency Handout/EPA /Landov hide caption

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Egyptian Presidency Handout/EPA /Landov

Saudi King Salman Reshuffles Line Of Succession

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Now this is an international baby: Born to a surrogate mom in Nepal (who was implanted with an egg from a South African donor) and now living in Israel with his parents, Amir Vogel Greengold (left) and Gilad Greengold. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Israeli Dads Welcome Surrogate-Born Baby In Nepal On Earthquake Day

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Reporter Jason Rezaian Being Held On 'Accusations,' Brother Says

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Saudi King Salman (center) appears alongside then-Crown Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz (third from left) and then-deputy Crown Prince and Interior Minister Mohammed bin Nayef (left) in January. Muqrin has since been pushed aside to make way for Mohammed. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Soldiers in Malta carry coffins during a funeral service for 24 migrants who drowned while trying to reach southern Italy. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

Malta's Coast Guard Rescues Migrants — And Feels The Strain

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Number Of The Week: Migrants En Route To Europe

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'Save Us, Save Us': A Poem For The Migrants Lost At Sea

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Armenian Christian women pray at St. Giragos Church in southeastern Turkey. The restored church, reopened in 2011, is the largest Armenian church in the Middle East. Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov

Invisible For Generations, 'Hidden Armenians' Emerge In Turkey

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One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Clearing The Tangled Path For Land Ownership In The West Bank

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Keith Murdoch, Father Of Media Baron, Disclosed Disaster At Gallipoli

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