An Egyptian man casts his vote Sunday in parliamentary elections at a polling station in Cairo. Allegations of widespread fraud and voter intimidation have marred the polls. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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A hybrid solarized gas turbine power station owned by AORA Solar, a new Israeli company pushing solar hybrid technology, sits in the southern Israeli kibbutz of Samar. David Buimovitch/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Volunteers packed into a room during a petition-drive training session in Cairo. Mohamed ElBaradei's National Association for Change movement has gathered 900,000 signatures on a petition to amend the constitution and end the stranglehold President Hosni Mubarak's ruling party has over elections. Holly Pickett for NPR hide caption

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Maliha, a Bedouin mother of four, at her home in Nuweiba, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. Holly Pickett for NPR hide caption

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The Two-Way

Egypt's State Security Gets Very Interested When Reporters Talk To Bedouins

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson was surprised by how fast authorities figured out where she was and who she was speaking to.

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Aida Abdel-Fattah doesn't believe it when promises are made about making life better in the Cairo slum where she lives. By Holly Pickett for NPR hide caption

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The Two-Way

In Cairo Slum, Little Hope For Change

The people have grown cynical over the years and no longer get their hopes up when government officials and journalists come around to ask about life here.

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Aida Abdel-Fattah stands in front of her home in the Duweika area of Cairo. Abdel-Fattah's home was damaged two years ago in a landslide that killed scores of her neighbors. She and others are still waiting to be resettled by the government, as their homes crumble around them. Holly Pickett for NPR hide caption

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