NPR logo

Submerging Markets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/96193541/136588309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Submerging Markets

Podcast

Submerging Markets

Romania, past and present. Mircea Rosca/AP Photo hide caption

toggle caption
Mircea Rosca/AP Photo

Submerging Markets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/96193541/136588309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Today on Planet Money:

Imagine a global slowdown. The strong, or stronger, countries help the weaker ones. But what if the stronger countries aren't so strong anymore? Just wondering.

Alan Greenspan blames the subprime mortgage crisis for the current economic crisis. Listener Chuck Tomlinson of Minneapolis-St. Paul asks whether that's putting the matter too simply.

— The federal government is now considering which banks to help with a capital injection and which to turn away. Paul Kiel of Pro Publica says taxpayers won't see much of what's happening behind the curtain.

— And about that global slowdown. Arvind Subramanian describes the situation in so-called emerging markets, places like Romania and India where the economy is suddenly slowing.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Music today: Snoop Dogg's "Drop It Like It's Hot." Follow our Twitter feed. Join our Facebook group.