NPR logo Blame Canada?

Blame Canada?

The Toronto Star is getting in on the blame game. Listener Shreve L. from Toronto points us to an article titled "Meet the Canadian whose big idea felled Wall Street." In it, the Star calls Former University of Waterloo statistician David X. Li the man who "supplied the matches" that burned down the American economy — a reference to Felix Salmon's piece in Wired. Shreve writes:

For the most part the readers who have commented on the article seem to see past the sensational headline, and find the articles nationality based attempt at blame distasteful. But perhaps its true that Canadians are at least a little proud to be included as part of the global catastrophe. Don't forget about us.

More typical of the coverage in the great white north is an often repeated pride that our Canada is different, and our cautious Canadian ways have now been proven correct. Here the subtle Canadian pride is most pronounced in 5 of Canada's major banks breaking into the top 10 of north American banking as US banks shrink. (Although, the recent announcement that Bank of Montreal was on AIGs bail out list makes you wonder how different they are..

I must say that the sitting government does like to insist that Canada is not apart of this financial crisis, and continues to say (as it has for a year) that Canada is different and won't see the worst of this. We'll be fine, no crisis here, move along folks nothing to see. (Though this posturing is now starting to show some serious cracks .)

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.