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Hear: Where It All Began

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On today's Planet Money:

— Imagine this whole darned economic crisis, or at least a major strand of it, started at a pink hotel in Boca Raton. A bunch of bankers from JPMorgan met there in 1994 to consider the future, and decided credit derivatives were it. Gillian Tett, the Financial Times writer and author of Fool's Gold, says the rest is history, miserable history.

— How much would you pay to keep your job? Margaret Schultz works as a management consultant with General Motors dealerships. In December, she learned that her position had been given to a former manager, whose own gig had been cut. There was still a job for her — three hours away from her husband and two young kids. Now she's staying in the new town three days a week, where she rents an apartment for $350 a month.

Bonus: A roast beef indicator.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Intro music: Empire of the Sun's "Walking On A Dream." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.

Ian sends an indicator from Seattle:

I have an indicator for you:
$7.25.

That is the cost of the meal deal formerly known as Arby's 5 for $5 where you pick five items from a small menu for a fixed price. The Northgate Arby's restaurant in Seattle is now offering the same menu at 5 for $7.25.

This is one of many little things Ive seen creeping up in price and so I feel you guys continue to be right that deflation is the least of our fears.

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