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'When Money Dies'

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'When Money Dies'

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'When Money Dies'

The height of German inflation. natehofer via Flickr hide caption

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'When Money Dies'

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On today's Planet Money:

— When most Americans think about financial collapse, they flash back to the Great Depression. The Germans are haunted by another ghost — hyperinflation. As countries around the globe pump money into the world economy to try to fix it, fears of inflation are once again growing. Josef Joffe, editor of Die Zeit, explains why history is haunting German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

— Unemployment is still climbing and that's left many people thinking about Plan B. Maybe you'd like to be a rock star or an organic farmer, but you're also probably thinking about that safety net job — a job you could easily get if you were laid off. Listener Laura Weight gives us a reality check on why that safety job may not be as attainable as we think.

Bonus: The scene in Den Haag.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Intro music: Gang of Four's "Natural's Not In It." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.

Economy sucks sale

Seen in Den Haag, Netherlands. Brett Neely hide caption

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Freelance journalist Brett Neely writes:

Despite the sign, the stores were actually full. In fact, I generally haven't seen people slow down their shopping here. It's a bit surprising to me, but I suspect that's because many European countries haven't experienced mass layoffs yet - economists think they'll come this summer. Instead, many workers have shorter working hours, which must give them more time to shop.

Recommended Reading/Listening:
When Money Dies: The Nightmare of the Weimar Collapse
Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on Worker Flows

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